HTC Wildfire Deals The technology that never gets outdated

The smart phone from the mobile giant are loaded with amazing features that make you an efficient worker and the sophisticated looks of the handset enhances your personality. HTC mobile phones have launched its latest innovation in the market the HTC Wildfire. This handset has cutting edge features and stunning looks. The gadget is available with various HTC Wildfire deals that you will find on several web portals and company outlets at pocket friendly rates. A handset is said to be a complete package when it has excellent features and great looks that attract you at the first site.

This handset has both these properties. This master piece works on the latest and the most popular Android OS, v2.1 (clair) and it has a powerful Qualcomm MSM 7225 528 MHz processor that provides a good backup to the functions and applications. With an excellent 5MP camera with video capability, autofocus and LED flash the user gets life like picture quality with a picture size of 2592 x 1944 pixels. the user can get himself updated with the latest news and happenings with the inbuilt HTML browser. The smart phone has a 384 MB RAM; 512 MB ROM and the external memory slot supports a memory space of up to 32GB that gives you a huge space to store your data and files.

Talking about the looks of the handset the gadget has a 3.2 inches TFT capacitive touch screen that supports 16M colors that gives you a great viewing experience and the display features Multi-touch input method Accelerometer sensor for UI auto-rotate, Touch-sensitive controls, Proximity sensor for auto turn-off, Optical track pad, HTC Wildfire deals and Turn-to-mute and lift-to-dim-out a call that enhances the beauty of the handset. The user has the option of running this gadget either on 2G or 3G network, the 3G networking is the latest facility that is provided in this handset, with the help of this the user gets fast internet speed video calling and many upgraded features.

There are many connectivity features in the handset like the EDGE, WLAN, GPRS, Bluetooth and USB with the help of which the user can share data with other devices that have similar features. With the HTML browser the user gets problem free internet access that keeps you connected with your loved ones and keeps you updated with the latest happenings. The handset measures 106.8 x 60.4 x 12 mm and it weights 118g.There are many HTC Wildfire deals in the market that gives you free gifts and incentives with the gadget. Through these deals you can get the handset at pocket friendly rates and you can also save your money. Before buying the deals you must compare them on the internet.

Changing Mindsets Digital Publishing is Not Simply a PDF

Publishers with back-catalogs of print-based content are looking for convenient ways to publish their content onto the growing digital platforms. Often times, the digital format they have comfortable with has been the PDF. However, when producing content in the form of eBooks or digital magazines, there are a lot of things that people have to take into account that aren’t as simple as exporting a PDF.

Page and Screen Size

PDF was developed for a specific output in mind: print. It has a fixed page size. While this worked for print, in the digital age your “page” is the computer screen. With tablets, smartphones, laptops, etc., there is no standardization of a screen size. You may have a 4:3 ratio on an iPad, but you may have a 16:10 screen size on a Motorola Xoom tablet, or 16:9 on a computer screen. What’s more, the physical size of these devices plays a massive role in legibility. It is important for content to be able to adapt to these different devices. Because PDFs are fixed size, this means something that may be intended for one device may be cropped or scaled on another device, which is far from ideal reading experience.

Design for Print Isn’t Design for Digital

When you look at print magazines or books, much of the design was based on a variety of factors including economics and production limitations. The size of body type may have been chosen to optimize the amount of content that will fit on a finite amount of page space or a cost limitation of color or substrates. In addition, print products are designed as “one size fits all” because there is no personalization to the reader. These limitations don’t apply to digital.

On platforms such as eBooks, text can be resized, reflowed, and repaginated to adapt to the size of of the device and the ability to read certain type sizes. Digital publishing platforms like Adobe Digital Publishing Suite encourages users to create custom layouts for device size and orientations. Someone who is 20 may have an easier time reading small print on a device as opposed to someone perhaps middle-aged. Users of digital devices have become accustomed to their devices personalizing content to their needs. Simply creating a PDF that people may need to pinch to zoom in doesn’t give an ideal user experience to your readership, and if you are producing publications that have competition, consumers will opt for the more intuitive experience.

Interactivity

Over the years, Adobe has extended PDF to be able to have interactive elements such as hyperlinks, videos, and even animation. The issues with this are often these interactive elements are dependent on Adobe Reader and Adobe Flash to read these animations. While mobile platforms like Apple iPad and Android are able to natively read PDFs, they often do not natively read the proprietary extensions Adobe has made to the PDF platform. What’s more, because Adobe has chosen to abandon Flash for mobile, the viability of interactive PDFs within the growing mobile market becomes questionable.

Interoperability

PDF is a dead-end format. What I mean by this is that the nature of the format mimics what it was intended for: print. Once ink hits the page, the code behind it that created it becomes irrelevant because the content was not intended to move from the printed page to another system, print is the end product.

Many of the platforms that are used in digital publishing today are based on technologies like HTML in order to allow the maximum flexibility between different platforms. Storing content in such a universal way also gives the maximum flexibility for future platforms. As digital publishing is rapidly changing as is the nature of the digital space, locking content into a single dead-end format like PDF only restricts your business opportunities moving forward.

Building a Foundation

When first examining the digital publishing, large companies rush to market based on the current print products that they offer. Because digital publishing is rapidly changing, it is a better investment to create a foundational platform that your digital offerings can grow from, rather than having to constantly patch new “hacks” to your current print workflow.

In the past, publishing has been controlled and powered by larger organizations because of the high initial investments for print. Now, smaller companies that have more flexibility are able to take risks on newer platforms and have the opportunity to develop their organizations in an adaptable way. If large organizations do not do this than they risk forever following behind the industry, rather than defining it.

How To Add Social Media Icons In Blogger

First off let me say that I am not an expert on Blogger. In fact I am quite the opposite – I am new to the blogging scene. For the past month I have been trying to figure out how to add Social Media icons to my blog. I would visit other blogs and be in awe of their cool social media icons. How did they do it?

It finally dawned on me that I could use similar steps that are based off a post I found from @moneysavingmom’s site about creating your own blog header.

Hope this helps any other new bloggers out there!

1.Open a Photobucket account if you don’t already have one. (Make sure your account is set to Public).

2. Download the social media icons you would like on your blog. Here a couple articles with really nice icons/icon packages that you can download for free:

33 Beautiful Social Media Sets for Designers and Bloggers

The Best Social Media Icons All in One Place

3. Upload the icons to your Photobucket account.

4. Open up a blank text file or word document. Note: You don’t have to do this step, but I did it to help me through the process.

5.In Photobutcket, navigate to one of the icons you want to use. Click in the box next to HTML code and paste it into a word or text document. (Image example can be found on Adventures as a Small Town Mom’s blog – just search for this article.)

6. For each HTML code you pasted in your text or word document, update href with your direct url for that respective icon. For example, for the Twitter icon update href with your twitter url (http://www.twitter.com/(insert your twitter @name).

7. Go to Design in Blogger and click Add Gadget.

8. Select the HTML/JAVA SCRIPT gadget.

9. Copy and paste in your HTML code from your word or tect doc of the icon(s) you want to display on your blog in the Content section. For the title, be creative – put ‘Stalk Me’ or ‘Follow Me’ or whatever you want (maybe just leave it blank).

10.Click Save and ta da! You should now have social media icon(s).

For resident experts, did I do it the hard way? Do you have any tips about adding social media icons?

Html5 – Not Designed For Business Applications

HTML5 – Not Designed for Business Applications

HTML5 is the next version of HTML to come along since version 4.0 in 1997.

HTML is an acronym for Hyper Text Markup Language and HTML elements are the basic building-blocks of web pages. The Internet would not exist as we know it today without HTML.

But HTML is not a programming language at all. This concept is confusing to some people. Web pages rely on a scripting language such as JavaScript in order to respond to user input. Think of it as HTML being a car and JavaScript being the engine.

JavaScript was introduced in 1995 by Netscape and coincidentally, that’s when the web started to really “take off”. This is an important fact to consider before we dig deeper into HTML5.

The open source nature of HTML and JavaScript has contributed to the growth of the Internet as a whole. Source code and design ideas are often borrowed from around the web and even from competitor’s web sites. This is facilitated by the fact that HTML and JavaScript are impossible to hide or protect.

HTML5 is no different!

There has been a lot of talk about HTML5 over the past couple of years and developers think that HTML5 is “cool” and “fun” to work with. But the logic ends there.

As usual with most new technologies, there has been confusion and misinformation over when HTML5 should be used and for what purpose. We aim to enlighten you about what HTML5 can and can’t do in this article.

New Features Same Old Concept

HTML5 includes new features such as the “Canvas” element, along with audio, video and Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG) content, some of which replace the “object” tags of HTML4. There have also been some modifications and standardization of tags such as (a, cite, menu) but the basic concept of HTML remains the same in HTML5.

Who’s Promoting HTML5?

HTML5 was originally proposed by Opera Software (makers of the Opera web browser) and designed by the World Wide Web Consortium, also known as W3C.

An important point is that the W3C has been criticized as being dominated by larger organizations and thus writing standards that represent their interests.

The large organizations (Apple, Microsoft, Adobe, Google and Facebook) have promoted HTML5 as the most up to date technology for web development. In fact the late Steve Jobs termed HTML5 as the win-win solution for consuming any kind of web content on all types of web platforms. But it is important to note that Apple, Microsoft, Google and Facebook each have an incentive for promoting HTML5; each own and operate very profitable “app” stores such as the Windows Marketplace, Google App Store, iTunes App Store, Facebook Canvas Apps, etc. Protection of intellectual property and trade secrets is of little or no concern to those companies and in fact it is almost a conflict of interest.

Fact #1: HTML5 is based on JavaScript, which is impossible to protect. Yes, that’s a fact!

As we discussed a moment ago, JavaScript is the core “language” of HTML5, whose source code is impossible to protect. The most evident reason is that anyone can view HTML5 and JavaScript source by just a simple click. JavaScript was never intended to be anything more than an engine for client-server communication and re-useable web content, including menus, buttons, tabs and the like.

Developers may argue that they can mangle JavaScript source code by obfuscation and pseudo-encryption (such as “minification”, where the code is compressed and “minified”). But this is a dangerously false sense of security. Any skilled developer can reverse engineer a “minified” or “obfuscated” JavaScript application. By design, JavaScript cannot be encrypted and it cannot be hidden. JavaScript files must be downloaded in order to run in a web browser.

To make matters worse, JavaScript also cannot be locked down to a specific web domain.

The code is accessible to be hacked by any competitor. No matter how many steps are taken to hide the JavaScript, the web browser eventually downloads the JavaScript file to run it within the client’s web browser.

For comparison, hacking a Flash or Silverlight application just by viewing the source is not very easy but anyone with a little knowledge of HTML5 can do it in minutes.

The hacks of famous HTML5 games like AngryBirds, Texas Holdem and many others are excellent examples of the insecure techniques employed by HTML5 developers. All security measures are useless once the code has been obtained and reverse engineered. No matter what any HTML5 or JavaScript developer may claim, these facts are true and irrefutable!

Fact #2: The concept of HTML5 Canvas is nothing new.

As we discussed already, HTML5 is based on the same concepts of HTML4. The most useful and talked about feature of HTML5 is the new “Canvas” object. Canvas makes it easy for JavaScript developers to “paint” within a web browser, simplifying the design of applications that utilize graphics. But you may be surprised to know that this functionality has been available in a simulated manner with very little attention since the release of HTML4.

Fact #3: There is a widespread misconception about HTML5

HTML5 has been labeled as a “cross platform programming language” which is a serious misconception. It is true that HTML5 is capable of running on all types of platforms such as Windows, Linux, Android and other mobile operating systems but let’s not forget that HTML5 is nothing more than web page markup, which is controlled by JavaScript. Classifying HTML5 and JavaScript as a true programming language would be incorrect. It is a browser integrated language that cannot utilize all the features of the underlying operating system.

When Should You Use HTML5?

The answer is quite simple. Use HTML5 when you do not care about your source code, intellectual property, or trade secrets. If you do not care that a competitor may steal your source code after it has been uploaded to your web site then use HTML5. As you can see, HTML5 is perfect for buttons, menus and website specific content, for which it was designed.

The Bottom Line – Better Options Available

The bottom line is that HTML5 and JavaScript are great for a lot of things, but you can’t effectively protect anything that you develop with them. This clearly doesn’t add up if you are using these technologies for developing business applications, which they were not designed for.

If you are developing a web application then consider using Flash or Silverlight, both of which run in all popular web browsers for desktop operating system, including Windows, Mac and Linux.

If you are developing a mobile application, there are far better options for iPhone, iPad and Android development that afford better protection of trade secrets, better security, performance and usability for the end user and also allow you to take advantage of the native features of the underlying operating systems. For iOS (iPad and iPhone), use the Object C programming language. For Android, use the Java programming language.

For Windows development, consider C++, C#, Delphi or other proven languages.

Although slightly more difficult to develop with, Objective C, C++, C#, Java and other low level languages are always the best option no matter if you are developing desktop, web, or mobile applications.

Permission to Redistribute

Copyright (c) 2012 by Modulus Financial Engineering, Inc. http://www.modulusfe.com All rights reserved. Permission is hereby granted to redistribute the article providing this copyright notice remains in place.

About the Author

Richard Gardner is Founder/CEO of Modulus Financial Engineering, Inc. In addition to his leadership role of the firms team members, Richard is an influential member of the financial technology industry at large, a globally-respected professional trader and software engineer, a guest speaker at industry conferences and among the inventors on over 70 technology patents.